adBlockCheck

Recent News

Most Notable Google Ventures

Ten years ago this week, Google Street View launched, offering panoramic views of locations all over the world. As the tech giant continues to debut new projects, The Onion highlights some of Google’s most ambitious ventures to date:

Rural Working-Class Archbishops Come Out In Droves To Welcome Trump To Vatican

VATICAN CITY—Arriving in their dusty pickup trucks from as far away as the dioceses of Oria and Locri-Gerace to express their support for a leader who they say embodies their interests and defends their way of life, droves of rural working-class archbishops reportedly poured into St. Peter’s Square today to greet U.S. president Donald Trump during his visit to the Vatican.

Rookie First Baseman Nervous To Chat With Baserunners

ATLANTA—Noting how important it is to make a good first impression, Pittsburgh Pirates rookie first baseman Josh Bell told reporters before Tuesday’s game against the Atlanta Braves that he’s still nervous about chatting with opposing baserunners.

What Is Trump Hiding?

As The Onion’s 300,000 staffers in its news bureaus and manual labor camps around the world continue to pore through the immense trove of documents obtained from an anonymous White House source, the answers that are emerging to these questions are deeply unnerving and suggest grave outcomes for the American people, the current international order, Wolf Blitzer, four of the five Great Lakes, and most devastatingly, the nation’s lighthouses and lighthouse keepers.

Deep Blue Quietly Celebrates 10th Anniversary With Garry Kasparov’s Ex-Wife

PITTSBURGH—Red wine and candlelight on the table before them, Deep Blue, the supercomputer that defeated reigning world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997, and Kasparov’s ex-wife, Yulia Vovk, quietly celebrated their 10th anniversary on Wednesday at a small French restaurant near Carnegie Mellon University, where Deep Blue was created.
End Of Section
  • More News

'Most E-Mailed' List Tearing New York Times' Newsroom Apart

NEW YORK—A feature on the New York Times' website that lists the stories most e-mailed by readers is destroying morale and escalating tensions among the once-dignified and professional Times staff, sources within the newspaper of record said Tuesday.

The <i>New York Times</i> office building, which used to house some of the most respected journalists in America.

This week's most frequently e-mailed story, titled "In Manhattan, Even Felines Have Therapists," which detailed the growing phenomenon of clinical depression among indoor urban cats, provoked a fresh round of envy and dismay among reporters still stinging from last week's top article, "Do You Really Have Time For Your Time-Share?".

"Your reputation is everything here at the Times, and if you want get known, you've got to deliver what readers want: differences between men and women, and photos of cats," national political reporter Adam Nagourney said. "I suppose I could be most e-mailed, too, if I sat in front of my computer all day making up cutesy names for government officials, like some redheaded Wednesday and Saturday columnists I know."

Along with most of his Times colleagues, Nagourney is convinced that online readers instinctively overlook harder news for the eye-catching Most E-Mailed box, making the pressure to craft articles with those magical "click and send" qualities that much more intense.

Executive editor Bill Keller said he believes that the Most E-Mailed list is causing "troubling" changes in the Times' editorial focus, as reporters increasingly neglect less attractive assignments.

"I've always encouraged our journalists to follow their instincts," Keller said. "But now I'm considering a more hands-on approach, especially since I've received no fewer than four 800-word pieces on 'man dates' in the past week alone."

According to Times insiders, nearly two dozen staffers, including four Pulitzer Prize winners and Baghdad correspondent John Burns, have requested transfers to the Times' Home & Garden and Travel desks.

Nagourney, currently stuck covering Barack Obama's presidential campaign in Minnesota, said he's been trying to make his stories more e-mail-friendly. But so far, success has eluded him.

"I thought my Elizabeth Edwards breast cancer article the other week had a great chance, as it was at the intersection of politics, health, death, and family—and had the word 'breast' in the headline—but it didn't even make the top 10," Nagourney said. "Whatever."

<p>"I'll write anything—do anything—to get on that list each week. I don't care what it takes."<br> <i>Times</i> columnist Paul Krugman</p>

White House correspondent David Sanger recalled his anger last month after seeing New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. compliment a first-year reporter who had gotten two stories on the Most E-Mailed list despite only having worked at the paper part-time for three months.

"I know I write some boring stuff, but I'm forced to: It's my job," Sanger said. "I've been here for almost 25 years, and Sulzberger hasn't said that many words to me the whole time."

Restaurant critic and Most E-Mailed list darling Frank Bruni dismissed the inter-office grousing, saying, "Some people have it, some people never will." Bruni's work topped the Most E-Mailed list eight times in the past year.

Other mainstays of the Most E-mailed List, such as columnist Frank Rich, experience the stress of having to maintain their success every week. While there are definite perks, such as sharing a lunch table with other widely e-mailed columnists, like Paul Krugman and Thomas Friedman, Rich said that the "once laid-back and carefree" working environment of the Times' midtown Manhattan offices has been replaced with suspicion and backbiting.

"Yesterday I was working in my cubicle, and I could hear some reporters at the water cooler a few feet away talking in stage whispers about how I was 'obviously' getting my friends to e-mail my columns around to artificially inflate their ranking, and it was very upsetting," Rich said. "Sure, some of my friends may have e-mailed them, but that's because they honestly liked them and people have the right to do that."

Columnist Nicholas Kristof, a Pulitzer Prize–winning former editor who has covered Asia and Africa for the Times, claimed not to be aware that his work frequently appears on the Most E-Mailed list, saying he "never so much as glances" at it.

"Who cares—lists are stupid and arbitrary," Kristof said. "Only shallow morons pay attention to them. As if an article is inherently better just because more people happen to read it. This isn't a popularity contest."

Kristof returned Thursday from the Sudan after a six-week-long investigation of the plight of displaced house cats in the genocide-ridden Darfur region. His findings will be published in next Sunday's New York Times Magazine.

More from this section

Rookie First Baseman Nervous To Chat With Baserunners

ATLANTA—Noting how important it is to make a good first impression, Pittsburgh Pirates rookie first baseman Josh Bell told reporters before Tuesday’s game against the Atlanta Braves that he’s still nervous about chatting with opposing baserunners.

Sign up For The Onion's Newsletter

Give your spam filter something to do.

Close