Webster's Reluctantly Adds 'Melty' To English Lexicon

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Webster's Reluctantly Adds 'Melty' To English Lexicon

SPRINGFIELD, MA—Representatives from Merriam-Webster grudgingly announced Tuesday that, due to the Taco Bell–coined term's recent publication in over 150 newspapers and periodicals, including Food & Wine, The Baltimore Sun, and Time, "melty" would be added to their 2008 collegiate dictionary.

"Melty, adjective: from the English 'melt'," Merriam-Webster president John Morse said in a series of words he never imagined he would ever have need to utter. "1: An edible foodstuff possessing viscous qualities; 2: See goolicious. I hereby announce my retirement."

The word "goolicious," an adjective describing something that is both melty and delicious, was also added to the English language.