adBlockCheck

Sports

OB-GYN Assures Serena Williams Fetus Developing Serve On Schedule

WEST PALM BEACH, FL—Observing that the unborn child was producing the smooth, fluid strokes expected in the third trimester, ob-gyn Dr. Theresa Umbers reportedly assured world No. 4–ranked tennis player Serena Williams at an appointment Tuesday that her fetus was developing its serve right on schedule.

New Report Finds MMA Could Be Bad For Your Knees

LOS ANGELES—Following a 10-year study of more than 500 professional and amateur fighters, a report released Thursday by the UCLA Department of Physiology found that mixed martial arts could be bad for your knees.

Mr. Met’s Son Beginning To Think He Adopted

NEW YORK—Pointing out that there was little physical resemblance between himself and the rest of his family, the 10-year-old son of New York Mets mascot Mr. Met told reporters Tuesday that he was beginning to think he was adopted.

Best Sports Stadiums

As Detroit prepares to demolish and say goodbye to the storied Joe Louis Arena, Onion Sports examines some of the greatest stadiums of all time.

Mom Finds Disturbing Reading Material In Teenage Son’s Bedroom

OMAHA, NE—Saying she felt disgusted and saddened by the shocking discovery, local woman Beth Loomis told reporters Thursday that she was deeply disturbed after finding recruitment reading material from the Baylor University football team in her teenage son’s bedroom.
End Of Section
  • More News

Women's Olympic Bobsled Team Hopes To Inspire Young Girls To Bobsled

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Olympic bobsledders Jean Racine and Gea Johnson have two major goals for the Salt Lake City Games. The first is to win the gold medal. The second is to let young girls know that they, too, can pursue their bobsled dreams.

Bobsledding role models Jean Racine and Gea Johnson.

"When I was growing up, little girls were encouraged to participate in sports like tennis and basketball, but never bobsledding," said Racine, 23, driver of the American women's two-person sled. "Well, I want that to change that for the next generation. I want to be the person today's young girls can look to and say to themselves, 'Hey, I can bobsled if I want to.'"

"One day," Racine continued, "people will see women bobsledders as bobsledders first and women second."

Johnson, the team's brakewoman, echoed Racine's sentiments.

"There has always been this assumption—and I don't know where it comes from—that girls aren't interested in bobsledding," the 34-year-old Johnson said. "I can remember, as a third-grader, telling my gym teacher that when I grew up, I wanted to be a bobsledder. He said, 'Why the hell would you want to do that?'"

Salt Lake City 2002 is the first Olympics to feature women's bobsledding as a medal event. As thrilled as Racine and Johnson would be to win that first-ever gold, just having the chance to serve as role models for the female bobsledders of tomorrow means as much to them.

The bobsledders of tomorrow.

"We have to be worthy ambassadors of bobsledding," Racine said. "We have to represent the sport well and be the kind of bobsledders today's young girls can aspire to be like. That's a heavy responsibility, but I feel up to the task."

Johnson said parents can play a vital role in opening up the bobsled doors for their daughters.

"Usually, parents let their little girls sled until they're a certain age, and then it's suddenly discouraged," Johnson said. "Boys can go on and become bobsledders, and that's okay with everyone. We have to let our girls know that there's nothing wrong with wanting to bobsled."

"Sports are so good for girls, particularly a sport like bobsledding," Racine said. "I've learned so much from it: how to be competitive, how to work hard, how to not give up. Bobsledding is like life: The harder you push at the beginning, the faster the ride is all the way down."

More from this section

New Report Finds MMA Could Be Bad For Your Knees

LOS ANGELES—Following a 10-year study of more than 500 professional and amateur fighters, a report released Thursday by the UCLA Department of Physiology found that mixed martial arts could be bad for your knees.

Sign up For The Onion's Newsletter

Give your spam filter something to do.

Close