Ask Popular Mechanics, March 1947

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Vol 38 Issue 25

Sherwin-Williams Triumphantly Reports Nearly Half The Planet Covered In Paint

CLEVELAND— Sherwin-Williams officials announced Monday that the company is nearing the midpoint of its 112-year project to cover the Earth in a coat of bright red paint. "We're proud to announce that the entire Northern Hemisphere should be slathered 10 feet deep in candy-apple red Latex Semi-Gloss by year's end," Sherwin-Williams CEO Christopher Connor said. "And we are fully confident that the rest of the globe can be completed well before the giant space bucket runs out of paint." For the more difficult second-phase painting of the Earth's underside, workmen equipped with spray hoses will be suspended by cables from the equator.

Winning Dad Forces Tired Child To Finish Monopoly Game

DOWNERS GROVE, IL— With hotels on Boardwalk and Park Place, Ted Cleamons, 36, forced his exhausted 8-year-old son Andy to stay up late Monday to finish their Monopoly game. "Come on, kiddo, it shouldn't be too much longer," Ted told a bleary-eyed Andy at 11:15 p.m., just past the game's three-hour mark. "Go again, you rolled doubles."

Missing White Girl Drives Missing Black Girl From Headlines

CORVALLIS, OR— Becky Van Gelder, an 11-year-old white girl from Corvallis, was abducted from her home Monday, bumping 10-year-old Chicago black girl Tyesha Washington from the nation's newspaper headlines. "When a child is harmed, we all lose a small piece of our collective innocence," said USA Today managing editor Donna McCutcheon, who moved the Washington abduction to page 23A to make room for Van Gelder on the cover. "Especially when it's a young blonde girl like Becky."

Israeli Bus Driver Wants Really Big Raise

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL— His nerves shot, Tel Aviv bus driver Yehuda Ben-Zvi said Monday that he wants a "really big" raise. "I'm sorry, but 20 lousy sheqels an hour to drive a bus in this country just doesn't cut it," said Ben-Zvi, 44, nervously scanning each person boarding his bus. "If they don't up me to at least 100 [sheqels] an hour, I'm outta here." Added Ben-Zvi: "Shit, it's not like I've got some deep commitment to providing public transportation. People can walk."

Executing The Mentally Retarded

The Supreme Court recently ruled that executing mentally retarded criminals is "cruel and unusual punishment," violating the Eighth Amendment. What do you think?
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Just Like Everything Else!: Fox 8 p.m. EDT/7 p.m. ABC Pete's wife is still on him about building that darn shed, these kids are going to be the death of Sheila and Dave, and the hot next-door neighbor is up in EVERYBODY'S business! Sunday nights on ABC couldn't be any more familiar!

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Man Considers Nodding Approvingly After Friend’s Drink Purchase

MEQUON, WI—Seeking to convey his endorsement of his acquaintance's selection at local bar Coney's Draft House this evening, area man Thomas Dodge told reporters that he was considering nodding approvingly at his friend’s alcoholic beverage pur...

Originality

Ask Popular Mechanics, March 1947

Dear Popular Mechanics, March 1947,

My father, who hasn't been the same since Mom died nine years ago, has finally found the courage to remarry. His new wife is a very nice person, and she certainly makes him very happy. But she insists that I call her "Mother," and she sometimes acts like she raised me. Needless to say, I resent this, but I don't want to upset my dad. How do I handle this sticky situation?

—Divided Loyalties In Delaware

Dear Divided,

Flying Wing A Three-Story Hotel In The Sky! Breaking the aerial sound barrier is all well and good for Colonel Yeager, but what about those businessmen who need to breakfast in Boston and sup in Sacramento? The experimental Flying Wing—now in the prototype stage at many American aircraft manufacturers and expected to see service sometime in the next decade—would allow these moguls to travel in true style! Picture a giant "boomerang" eased through the sky by eight Voight-Corsair prop engines, and you have the general idea. And since it's all one giant lifting body, it can support much greater useful interior volume. What does that mean? How about a four-star kitchen, movie theater, and handball courts complete with hot showers—all available as you cruise along at 300 em-pee-aitch, a full mile above the plains! We think even Mr. Yeager would find that hard to pass up.

Dear Popular Mechanics, March 1947,

I love my boyfriend, but he always has to be the center of attention. He's the bride at every wedding and the corpse at every funeral. Not only does this push me to the side, but it causes people to overlook what a great guy he is otherwise. Am I being uptight or do I have reason to complain?

—Upstaged In Upper Darby

Dear Upstaged,

Fibre-Glas Birdhouse Eliminates Time-Consuming Seasonal Repainting! Every spring, it's always on your to-do list: Take the bluebird house off its post and put a fresh dose of cheery red paint over the old, winter-faded coat. Luckily for you, a new Miracle Material from the DuPont Corporation called "Fibre-Glas" may soon make spring birdhouse-painting a thing of the past. Fibre-Glas is a Jet-Age "Composite" material with the colors chemically bonded right into its resin base. That means it should be years before the tough, colorful, impact-resistant, injection-molded shell of your new fibre-glas birdhouse, available in better hardware stores this summer, will show any appreciable wear. And if it does, what do you care? The inexpensive Fibre-Glas process means you can replace Cock Robin's chateau whenever it starts looking lackluster—or whenever the lady of the house decides on a new favorite color!

Dear Popular Mechanics, March 1947,

Like many people, I try to keep my work and personal life separate. But recently, my coworkers heard me on the phone inviting people to a party I'm having. Now I feel pressure to invite them, too. I don't want to make enemies at work, but I really want this to just be my non-work friends. How do I handle this?

—Compartmentalized In Comstock

Dear Compartmentalized,

Automatic Sidewalk Eases Urban Commute! Dusty, dirty, loud, and jostling, the "concrete canyons" of such million-man metropoli as Chicago and Manhattan are what give America's greatest cities their charm... and aggravation. City life means sidewalks, which means "your dogs are barking" after a long day of beating the streets. But some see a very different possibility for put-upon pedestrians. The "Move-Walk," a self-propelled sidewalk made of rubberine conveyor belting, may someday carry city dwellers to work, shop, and play along such storied thoroughfares as Broadway or the Miracle Mile! New advances in electrical motorization and polylatex sheeting mean we could soon see the advent of the moving sidewalk. Commuters will take their ease, peruse the paper, even enjoy a hot dog while breezing along at five miles an hour—quick enough to get you there in time, but without ruining your good suit of clothes. Look for the first Move-Walks in larger cites by 1958.

Popular Mechanics, March 1947, is a syndicated advice columnist whose weekly column, Ask Popular Mechanics, March 1947, appears in more than 250 newspapers nationwide.

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