10 Songs You Didn’t Know Were Written About Celebrities

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10 Songs You Didn’t Know Were Written About Celebrities

“You Oughta Know” – Alanis Morissette (1995): While speculation has persisted for years regarding just whom Morissette was addressing in this timeless cut off the celebrated ’90s album Jagged Little Pill, the songwriter herself recently admitted what many had long suspected: The tune was written about renowned actor and her former flame Tom Selleck.
“F**k You!” – Cee Lo Green (2010): This bouncy, instantly recognizable pop tune provides a real-life account of Cee Lo Green’s frustration and resentment at losing his former girlfriend to the far more suave and wealthy Tom Selleck.
“Hey Jude” – The Beatles (1968): This iconic Beatles hit was also inspired by the work of Selleck, then an aspiring commercial actor and two-time contestant on The Dating Game, who was known to the Fab Four by his nickname, “Jude.” Following the success of the single, the band also composed 17 more songs about the man for their Selleck-based concept album, Abbey Road.
“The Girl From Ipanema” – Antônio Carlos Jobim (1962): While a faulty translation from the original Portuguese has led many to incorrectly believe that this bossa nova classic was written about a comely beauty strolling past a group of lovestruck onlookers in Rio de Janeiro, Jobim actually wrote it about the true object of his fascination: a “tall and tan and young and lovely” Tom Selleck.
“Jeremy” – Pearl Jam (1991): Pearl Jam’s early-’90s rocker courted controversy with its disturbing lyrics and graphic music video, both of which were drawn directly from television and film actor Tom Selleck’s troubled childhood, including his violent outbursts and intense feelings of alienation.
“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” – Gil Scott-Heron (1971): Accompanied by spare percussion backing, jazz poet Scott-Heron’s definitive call to revolution contains numerous oblique references to his lifelong best friend Tom Selleck, with the Mr. Baseball actor himself playing the conga drums in the original recording.
“Candle In The Wind” – Elton John (1973): The subject of Sir Elton’s emotional piano ballad becomes immediately evident from its opening line, “Goodbye, Tom Selleck.”
“Star Wars (Main Theme)” – John Williams (1977): While director George Lucas reportedly requested that legendary film composer John Williams consider the nature of good triumphing over evil when writing this stirring overture to heroism and adventure, the conductor found his true muse for the piece in actor Tom Selleck, who had recently made a name for himself with a number of indelible appearances in dramatic television movies. Williams would later cite the future Three Men And A Baby star as his inspiration for the “Imperial March” and the entire E.T. soundtrack as well.
“Lola” – The Kinks (1970): This intensely catchy chart-topping rock track, which still enjoys heavy radio play to this day, famously chronicles band manager Robert Wace’s sexual encounter with a transvestite Tom Selleck in Soho, London.
“Magnum, P.I. Theme” – Mike Post (1981): While many people erroneously believe that this memorable television show theme song was written to evoke the cool swagger of Tom Selleck, who portrayed the program’s lead character, composer Mike Post has repeatedly affirmed that the song is an ode to veteran actor John Hillerman, who played Tom Selleck’s persnickety British foil on the hit TV show.
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