Study: Those Who Go To College Earn More Degrees Over Lifetime Than Those Who Do Not

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Online University Allows Students To Amass Crippling Debt At Own Pace

SAN DIEGO—Touting its wide range of financially ruinous academic programs that can be tailored to meet anyone’s scheduling needs, officials at Enterprise College announced Monday that the online institution is committed to letting students amass a crippling amount of debt at their own individual pace.

Pros And Cons Of The Greek System

College communities across the nation have become more divided over the merits of Greek life on campus, with advocates saying that it promotes friendship and charity, and critics arguing that it can lead to hazing, underage drinking, and other dangerou...

College Encourages Lively Exchange Of Idea

Students, Faculty Invited To Freely Express Single Viewpoint

BOSTON—Saying that such a dialogue was essential to the college’s academic mission, Trescott University president Kevin Abrams confirmed Monday that the school encourages a lively exchange of one idea.
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Study: Those Who Go To College Earn More Degrees Over Lifetime Than Those Who Do Not

WASHINGTON—Confirming the conventional wisdom regarding the importance of college attendance in obtaining a diploma, a study published Monday by the National Education Association found that individuals who go to college earn more degrees over their lifetime than those who do not. “Our data suggests, quite convincingly, that those who pursue higher education invariably obtain more baccalaureates,” NEA researcher Denise Hallinan said, adding that the study’s findings cut across all socioeconomic brackets and applied to state and private schools equally. “And the degree acquisition gap only widens further once people go on to graduate school, with individuals at the Ph.D. level typically earning a full three more degrees than persons who did not attend college at all.” The study comes on the heels of a recent Labor Department report that found the nation’s best-paying jobs were dominated entirely by people who applied for them.