Famous Boycotts In U.S. History

Illustration for article titled Famous Boycotts In U.S. History

Politically driven boycotts of consumer products and pressure on companies to stop advertising on controversial platforms have been a hallmark of the Trump era, but boycotts in America go back well before the 45th president. The Onion takes a look at the history of consumer boycotts in the U.S.

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1960s:

To protest segregation, wealthy Americans boycott use of public transportation.


1965:

Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers lead the Delano grape strike, successfully convincing millions of Americans to continue not buying fresh fruit.

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1970:

Antiwar protests encourage housewives to find household alternatives to Dow Chemical’s napalm.

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1980:

President Jimmy Carter calls for boycott against the Moscow Olympics in effort to escalate conflict in Afghanistan.

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1986:

U.S. boycotts South African products over apartheid on the grounds that systematic racial segregation was more of a 1960s thing.

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1997:

Local mother Diane Travers stopped taking her family to Applebee’s because she heard a guy at the bar say “cocksucker.”

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2010:

Outrage over the company’s role in a massive oil spill spurs a boycott of BP gas stations, which everyone seems to have forgotten about now.

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2012:

Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy declares his opposition to gay marriage, leading millions of gay rights advocates to continue eating Chick-fil-A.

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2018:

Apparently Kyle’s ex works at Jimmy John’s now, so we have to start going to the Jersey Mike’s on South 15th instead.

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2019:

People boycotting SoulCycle over CEO’s support of Trump going to be floored when they find out about rest of country’s ultra-wealthy business owners.

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