Historians Trace Catholic Practice Of Eating Fish On Fridays Back To Third-Century Long John Silver’s Promotion

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SOUTH BEND, IN—According to a new paper published by historians from the University of Notre Dame, the Catholic tradition of eating fish on Fridays can be traced back to a third-century Long John Silver’s promotion. “Pope Sixtus II was a huge fan of the chain, and urged all of his flock to join him after Mass,” said paper coauthor Joseph Clark, who explained that while Catholic scholars had previously believed that Sea-Shares were a recent menu addition, the historians had discovered evidence that the promotion has existed since approximately 250 A.D. when the first Long John Silver’s opened by the Spanish Steps. “We believe there may have been a buy two, get one promotion the pope was trying to take advantage of that he would have otherwise not been able to afford. Shortly after that first gathering at the fast food chain, Long John Silver’s started offering a $3 two-piece combo every Friday night, and the pope cemented the practice as a Lenten tradition. Our records show he even went as far as consecrating hush puppies.” At press time, Clark added that Pope Sixtus II was unfortunately martyred late one night after getting into a fight with another Long John Silver’s customer.